Tinkerbell

Diskutiere Tinkerbell im Graupapageien Forum im Bereich Papageien; Dieses wird von Englisch mit http://www.google.com/language_tools?hl=de übersetzt, das Sie und Paste http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9 in...

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  1. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    Dieses wird von Englisch mit
    http://www.google.com/language_tools?hl=de

    übersetzt, das Sie und Paste http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9 in das googletranslater auch kopieren können, also können Sie es auf Deutsch lesen.
    Es gibt immer Gefahren und Nutzen in alles, das wir. Sport wie das Felsenklettern und Scubatauchen ist ohne das rechte Wissen und das Training sehr gefährlich. Aber, selbst wenn man nicht das Felsenklettern oder Scubatauchen tut, können wir andere, an diesem Sport aufzupassen genießen. Sie können gerade gehen, einige der Fotos von Tinkerbell im Flug zu genießen, während sie mit uns in den Bergen erlischt und Wälder von Taiwan
    Tinkerbell an Chipeng2 http://community.webshots.com/album/196810241XpbimG
    Tinkerbell bei Kenting http://community.webshots.com/album/147375155liaHcd
    Tinkerbell in Taroko
    http://community.webshots.com/album/183161569sNswbU, nachdem Sie jene Fotos sehen, Sie entscheiden können, wenn die Gefahr des Verwendens eines gut entworfenen Kabelstranges und der Linie den Nutzen zum Vogel und zu sich wertIST.
    Einen Vogel herauszunehmen der Fliege ohne das Training und das Wissen und gut die entworfene Ausrüstung ist zum Vogel gefährlich. Ihr Vogel muß unterrichtet werden, daß clickertraining also -sie mit Ihrem Vogel abbinden. Ihr Vogel muß unterrichtet werden, daß Rückruf also sie zu Ihnen zurückkommen. Ihr Vogel muß in grossen umfaßten Bereich geflogen werden viele Male und erfolgreich zurückgerufen worden zu Ihnen vor Ihnen sogar denken Sie an das Verwenden des Kabelstranges und zeichnen Sie Sie muß Ihren Vogel lieben und mit ihr geduldig sein. Der Kabelstrang und die Linie müssen als Sicherheitsausrüstung angesehen werden, um zu verhindern, daß der Vogel weg fliegt, wenn sie plötzlich erschrocken werden. Der Kabelstrang und die Linie dürfen nicht als etwas angesehen werden, Ihren Vogel an Sie zu binden. Sie sollten alle lesen, die ich zur Entdeckung den Fehlern schrieb, daß ich bildete, also Sie nicht, brauchen jene gleichen Fehler zu erleiden. Wenn Leute gegen das Verwenden des Kabelstranges und des Fliegens warnen, finden Sie bitte, wenn sie diese Erfahrung und Wissen haben. Haben sie versuchten überhaupt daß selbst und sie kennen wirklich die betroffenen Gefahren. Wenn jene Leute sie nicht getan und nicht wissen haben, über was sie sprechen, möchten Sie zu ihnen hören? Oder Sie können meine Fotos sehen und meine Erfahrungen lesen und sie für Sie und Ihre Vögel verwenden. Sie ist, damit Sie entscheiden und ich respektiere Ihre Wahl.

    Wärmster Respekt
    Shanlung
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9


    ======================================================

    This is translated from English using
    http://www.google.com/language_tools?hl=de

    You can also copy and paste http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9 into the google translater so you can read it in German.

    There are always risks and benefits in everything that we do. Sports like rock climbing and scuba diving will be very dangerous without the right knowledge and training. But even if one does not do rock climbing or scuba diving, we can enjoy watching others at that sport. You can just go to enjoy some of the photos of Tinkerbell in flight as she goes out with us in the mountains and forests of Taiwan

    Tinkerbell at Chipeng2
    http://community.webshots.com/album/196810241XpbimG

    Tinkerbell at Kenting
    http://community.webshots.com/album/147375155liaHcd

    Tinkerbell in Taroko
    http://community.webshots.com/album/183161569sNswbU

    After you see those photos, you can decide if the risk of using a well designed harness and line is worth the benefits to both the bird and yourself.

    Taking a bird out to fly without the training and knowledge and well designed equipment is dangerous to the bird.

    Your bird must be taught clicker training so you bond with your bird.

    Your bird must be taught recall so she comes back to you.

    Your bird must be flown in big covered area many times and recalled successfully to you before you even think of using harness and line

    You must love your bird and be patient with her.

    The harness and line must be regarded as safety equipment to prevent the bird from flying away when suddenly frightened. The harness and line must not be regarded as something to tie your bird to you.

    You should read all that I wrote to find the mistakes that I made so you need not suffer those same mistakes.

    If people warn against using harness and flying, please find if they have that experience and knowledge. Have they ever tried that themselves and do they truly know the dangers involved.

    If those people have not done it and do not know what they talk about, do you want to listen to them?

    Or you can see my photos and read my experiences and use them for you and your birds.

    It is for you to decide and I respect your choice.

    Warmest regards

    Shanlung
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9können, also können Sie es auf Deutsch lesen.
     
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  3. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

  4. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

  5. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    Die obere Fotographie ist ein Teil einer Reihe Fotographien. Der Rest kann innen gesehen werden

    http://community.webshots.com/album/193177124srfoNO/2


    [​IMG]

    Diese Fotographie ist ein Teil der Reihe unten

    http://community.webshots.com/album/183120264DSTmOt


    Was mir geschrieben werde, ist für altavista Übersetzer zu kompliziert. Ich bin traurig, auf englisch zu schreiben.

    Ich hoffe, daß ich nicht niemand beleidige, indem ich hier auf englisch schreibe.

    What I am written is too complex for altavista translator. I am sorry to write in English.

    I hope I do not offend anyone by writing here in English.

    What I have done can be done by you and others.

    I have been writing for years in the English language parrot world. You can see that from the letters in the webpage.

    Recently, I reach out to other parrot lovers who may not use English. It is not easy to use translator. But when I need to talk in Spanish, French, German,Russian, Chinese, and Japanese, I am happy I have a translator. They are all reading on Tinkerbell just as you are right now.

    What I do with Tinkerbell is dangerous and must be done very cautiously.

    Tinkerbell goes out with me all the time, almost everyday, in her harness I designed after finding that those commercially obtained from the net are so terrible in their basic fundamental design.

    Or again, there may be designed for clipped parrots but even then, they have fatal flaws in their design.

    Tinkerbell was about 4-5 months old when she came to me. She stayed with me for about 3 years.

    I made it a point to document all the training and mistakes I made so you never need to make those mistakes.

    I rather believe that good training and bonding must eventually replace the clipping of wings on all our birds.


    The relationship between me and Tinkerbell have been one of equal standing even if she thinks she is superior to me. If you decide that you are ' the one to be obeyed' and they are 'the one that must obey you', you set the tone that your relationship with them will never be one of friendship. The warmness of a richer relationship will never be yours ever to follow.

    Can you ever be close friend to a guy that demand your abject obeyance and treat him as alpha at all times? And discipline you should you fail?

    You know that you get what you put in, such as sport or golf or darts. That is between you and an inanimate object. How much more it will be when that object is an incredibly intelligent creature such as your bird who can and will respond and build up on the relationship that you are reaching out to him/her (I never can call animals it).


    I used clicker training on Tinkerbell and on my cat and ferret. I thought I was great until I met on the internet a 14 year old boy who told us that he uses clicker training to train his gold fish to do tricks. (Instead of clicker, he uses a light to shine)

    And before you think I am that superb, let me assure you all that there is one man I met in Taiwan that I felt my efforts were so pathetic in comparison to and who made me feel so humble and ended up very good friends. Our evening partings are normally with me staggering in a drunken state back to my hotel room.

    You can read all about him in my written encounters with the
    TsaoLing Bird Whisperer (a man who talk with birds). Read about him before you want to praise my efforts too much.

    Unfortunately, his methods are not transferable to me or to you as we are mere mortals. What I wrote have been snapshots of those moments. I met him three times. To understand fully the extent of that Bird
    Whisperer of Tsaoling, read my initial meeting with him, then the Tsaoling BW revisited and Tsaoling 2 bottles of Drambuie. You can see within the short time span of my visits, he trained additional wild birds to be at his beck and call.

    Some other readers felt that I wrote rather mystically of my methods. To me it is nothing mystical, and more a different outlook and mindset. What I have done can be done by you. WHat that Tsaoling BW does is beyond my comprehension all together.

    As to what tricks Tinkerbell does, I really do not know. You see, the tricks I taught him was accidental, coming about more from an effort to keep her mentally challenged to retain her interests. I touched on that now and then in the letters as and when they occured as I never did classified that as tricks.

    I was one of the earlier members of free flight group, a group of parrot lovers who consider allowing parrots to fly at home. Two years ago, I was the first who searched for a huge empty office space to take Tinkerbell out of just the small house environment to let her fly and documented that (and my mistakes) for the general public. Two years later, other members of that freeflight group (already leaders of all that want to have flighted parrots) decided to do that as well.

    While we need the guidance of others, there come a time when one must strike out on your own. During a long ride up the Taiwan mountains after my disasterous totally free flight attempt with Tink, I decided I needed to take a new road where our fids can join us on harness. I did not realise I was going to be the pioneer as well. That is good and bad. I needed to clear more misconceptions than I ever imagined. People who never flown parrots or used harnesses (I suspect they never know what is a harness) seemed to be a much better expert on what they do not know. I feel sorry for them.

    We need to expose our parrot to new conditions, strong shifty winds, let them know what is flying high and flying from high to low, impossible to duplicate in enclosed areas. That is when I parted from freeflight group. Now two years later, many of them agree with me now. With a good proper harness, Tinkerbell comes out with me almost everyday and get exposed and familiarised with all different conditions. After the initial jitteriness, she showed she relished new changes. You can see for yourself the series of photos as we rode through towns and forests and the way she looked at the surroundings. She flew with me in force 7 conditions when I had to lean into the wind. She saw the sun and clouds and the stars and twinkling fire flies with me at night. Deep in the forests or on the mountain tops where one can look and see forever in the distance. What that does to her mind, you will agree is a lot more than if she sees only the four walls of the apartment.

    I wrote a lot on the training, how to do the training in the emails/articles in the webpage. I was just re-reading the introduction I wrote in that webpage. That contains so much more of the fundamentals as they were so much more immediate to me that time then now, and essential even before you think of starting clicker training.

    For me to talk on those matters now, I can at best only gloss over them and the essential details may well be overlooked and left out by me now. It is in your best interests to read those earlier letters. Some are much shorter than the intro. But then some are much longer.


    Of course, if you want to raise any points of what I have written and if I can answer, I will do my best.

    If you find http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9 to be interesting and useful, please send it on to your friends who may be interested.
    _________________
    ShanLung

    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9
     
  6. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    To all my friends across the world.

    There are two main groups. The first group are those
    that I was writing to when I was with Tinkerbell and
    who knew me for years. The other group are my recent
    friends including non-English speaking friends from
    Russia, Germany, France, Spain, Japan, and Chinese
    from Taiwan and China. This email will be going to
    both groups. For the sake of translation, I will try
    to keep my sentences short.

    To that first group, I must say sorry for having left
    you in silence for such a long time. I have found it
    too painful to write to you after my separation from
    Tinkerbell.

    I did write again to let you people know I was safe
    during the tsunami on 12/26. I thank you all for
    writing and I read all the letters even though I did
    not answer at that time.

    Let me make amends now and you may understand better
    why I was silent.

    My contract in Taiwan came to an end on 14 Oct 2004
    and I had to leave Tinkerbell with my Taiwanese friend
    and his family. I still hope to be back in Taiwan
    again even as the plane brought me and my wife to
    Singapore.

    As to how much animals bond with humans, I have to
    tell you of Ivan my cat. Ivan was a kitten in 1997
    when he was rescued to live with us in Hong Kong. I
    have mentioned in a group that Ivan appeared to be
    psychic. You may like to read of that in
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/ivan1.html

    In those days, they did not have the scare of avian
    flu or new diseases. When we had to return to
    Singapore, it was easy enough to bring Ivan back with
    us. Ivan did not join us when we went to Taiwan as we
    did not wish to suhject him to a 3 month quarantine.
    I do love Ivan very much.

    Ivan was kept by my mother-in-law in a big enclosure
    with other cats. In the brief sporadic visits back,
    Ivan seemed to ignore me.

    A few days after we got back to our apartment in
    Singapore, Ivan was brought back to me by Joy's
    mother. After 4 years of being apart from me, I
    thought he may have forgotten me.

    I first heard him screaming and calling from his
    carrier cage as he was brought to the apartment. When
    the cage door was opened, Ivan came out, look very
    intensely at me and screamed and meowed even louder
    for at least a minute.

    Ivan then looked away from me to the nearby table and
    was quiet. I thought that with all that strange
    screaming, perhaps he remembered me after all. I was a
    bit disappointed that he did not purr and do his
    figure of 8 curling and rubbing on my ankles.

    What he did next was something he never did before.
    Ivan jumped up to the table next to me and leapt
    immediately up from the table to my shoulder. He then
    curled himself around my neck, and continued that
    screaming right into my ear while rubbing and rubbing
    his head on my cheek and ear. He remained on my
    shoulder and refused to be taken off.


    http://community.webshots.com/user/shimmertje in the
    Halftail album

    When I had to leave Tinkerbell, some of you wrote to
    assure me she will remember me. After this
    demonstration from Ivan, I do know for sure that none
    of the animals that we are close to will ever forget
    us. I was tremendously touched by Ivan.

    As I do not feel Singapore to be a place I can call my
    home even though I was born here. It claimed to be
    democratic having regular elections. Elections are
    also regularly hold in pre Saddam Iraq, North Korea
    and Cuba. Many people here do not wish to ever retire
    in Singapore. I share such sentiments. But now as
    Singapore will not allow me to bring back Tinkerbell,
    this place will never be my home.

    In mid Nov, I was so delighted to receive a phone call
    from Taipei to be prepared to return to Taiwan on a
    new contract. I wanted nothing more in my life than
    that. I was already thinking of chapter 2 with
    Tinkerbell and how to write and let you all know. But
    a week after that phone call, I was told the contract
    price was arbitarily cut and that cut fell on my
    department.

    That was painful. For a couple of weeks after that, I
    was in a daze.

    Life have to go on.I thought of going for a scuba
    diving holiday in Thailand and then on to Laos. (I am
    a qualified PADI Rescue Diver).

    A childhood friend was planning to go to Kuching,
    Borneo and wanted me and Joy to join him there.

    When I was in Taiwan, I have seen many small orang
    hutans (this is a malay term translating directly to
    man forest) kept in tiny cages in restaurants to
    attract customers. I have wanted to see them in the
    wilds. When in Taiwan, I also saw the Rhinocerous
    Hornbills in a park with their wings clipped. Those
    are big and beautiful birds that I also wanted to see.


    With the strong persuasion from my good friend, I
    changed my plans and was in Borneo instead. That was
    where I wrote to you from to let you know I was safe.

    Joy and I went to the Semenggoh center for orang
    hutans rehabilitation.
    http://www.cuti.com.my/Sub/Sarawak/guide_semenggoh.htm

    This is an old center and all the orang hutans are
    already released into the forest. However, they have
    supplementary feedings at 9 am and 3 pm. If the orang
    hutans cannot find sufficient food, they will turn up
    for the supplementary feedings. We were told that
    there may be a dozen or more.

    In our first day at Semenggoh during the 3 pm feeding,
    we saw a small orang hutan. She was high up in the
    tree top slowly moving about. She did not come down.
    I was happy even if I saw her at a distance. At least
    this time it was in the wild. I seen too many of them
    chained and caged and it felt majestic to see even one
    orang hutan in the wild.

    I sincerely hope that the other orang hutans
    integrated themselves back into the wild. Semenggoh
    center is surrounded by villages and plantations. Even
    though that great ape is under total protection, it
    may be possible that some may be killed.

    I was disappointed on the hornbills. They are huge
    birds with a beautiful horn.
    http://orientalbirdimages.org/birdi...rd_ID=326&Bird_Image_ID=155&Bird_Family_ID=70

    I never expect to see them close. I kept my eyes and
    ears for them. I was very disappointed not to see a
    single hornbill. They were supposed to be very common
    in Borneo. It is a tragedy if the hornbills are found
    only in zoos.

    We planned to go up river and deeper into the forests.

    That was when we got news of the tsunami. Some of you
    were worried enough to write directly to me when I
    wrote to all the groups to let you know we were safe
    in Borneo.

    All our plans changed after that. In the face of that
    tragedy, I did not wish to continue with our travels.

    You may like to see and read of that trip. My wife
    Joy invites all of you to

    Pictures of Kuching at
    http://public.fotki.com/shimmertje

    Account of the Kuching trip at
    http://www.worldisround.com/home/shimmertje/index.html

    For a few weeks after that even after we returned to
    Singapore, the news of tsunami and its victims kept me
    on the CNN and BBC.

    I read all the letters you wrote me that time and I am
    touched. But I just could not reply at all. It was
    still kind of painful to write to the groups I was in
    for years. After looking at all those devastation and
    the troubles of other people, my problems seem more
    mundane.

    I decided to reach out to non English speaking parrot
    lovers as I felt the lessons and knowledge I learned
    may be appreciated by them as well. In my discussions
    with them, I realised that while I wrote in detail,
    that will not be sufficient for them to do what I have
    done with Tinkerbell.

    Over the next few weeks, I will be writing more.

    I have stayed in touch with Mr Yu who is looking after
    Tinkerbell in Taiwan. He also wrote to me after that
    tsunami and I called him on the phone to let him know
    we were safe, and to talk to Tink.

    I last spoke to him a few days ago and to Tinkerbell
    too. He told me Tinkerbell will get excited when he
    talks to me. Then when the phone is given to her, she
    will remain very still as she hears me. He send me
    some photographs taken of her around mid January 2005.

    You can see that in the folder below. Tinkerbell
    still looks beautiful to me. You can see the state of
    her health.


    Tinkerbell and Yu family

    http://community.webshots.com/album/266245549kjbdKy

    Just two days ago, I was checking my camera and found
    some photographs taken during my last few days in
    Taiwan. I did not realise until I saw those
    photographs that Joy caught the handover of Tinkerbell
    to Mr Yu on that 13 Oct that I wrote about.

    Tinkerbell - Last days and handover
    http://community.webshots.com/album/266246996HQjfld

    There is another album that perhaps you may like to
    see. I was at a friend's house recently. You may
    like to see me with Black Palm and Moluccan cockatoos
    and other parrots that he kept. I stayed clear of them
    for a while to let them get used to me. I talked to
    them. I then knew that they liked me. Luckily I was
    right. They got huge beaks.

    Friend's parrots and 2s
    http://community.webshots.com/album/247421104ZXMpJM

    My friends, I will be going to Laos and Thailand over
    the next two months. I rather be out of Singapore then
    be in Singapore.

    On Sunday 6 Feb, I will be flying off to Bangkok and
    making my way into Laos. Eventually, in some internet
    cafe somewhere, I will be reading all your letters to
    me and continue my writings on the care and training.

    Shanlung
     
  7. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    10 Feb. 05

    From a cybercafe in VangVieng Laos. Just reached into
    town this afternoon from Vientiene. Evening time now
    after a nice stroll by and in a shallow river with
    crystal clear water. The sight of the jagged Kartz
    type of limestone hills just breathtaking across the
    river.


    To all English and non English groups

    Tinkerbell Legacy - Having a flying parrot - Ranting
    01

    I presume at this stage you do want to keep a flying
    parrot at home with you. Even if you do have a
    clipped parrot now, you are interested in this
    possibility.

    Not all people will be able to keep flying parrots
    with them at home. I am not speaking of making an
    aviary outside the home. This is about keeping a
    flying parrot with you at home. This is of supreme
    importance to the bonding that you will make with her
    and to the training that you will be doing together

    I am speaking from my experiences with Tinkerbell. I
    will refer her. This may not apply to your parrot.
    Even if you have a Congo African Grey, the temperament
    of parrots may be different. Their background and
    history may be different requiring a different
    approach. I hope my experiences may be of use to you.

    The last couple of weeks, I have been trying to set up
    a framework so I can write systematically.
    Unfortunately, much of the topics are so inter
    connected. I cannot write on one matter without
    drawing from experiences from another matter. So I
    give up and will just be writing free hand and without
    structure. Let us see how it goes like. Your
    suggestions warmly welcomed.


    There are many articles in the Internet in addition to
    what I have written as to why it is much better and
    healthier that your parrot be allowed to fly.

    You can use
    http://www.shynefoundation.org/articles.html to start
    with.


    You should also join the free flight group
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Freeflight/


    You MUST know more about clicker training. I will
    talk more on this later. You can get more information
    from two very good groups on clicker training for
    parrots.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/clickbirds

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Bird-Click


    We need to be realistic with ourselves. What we are
    doing is a long term approach as we come to terms with
    living with a flying parrot. However, we do change
    with time. What seems to be difficult to do in the
    beginning will be a matter of routine later on.

    Let us consider first the home environment.

    The safety and the security of our parrots will be the
    paramount importance. In this matter, I refer to both
    clipped and unclipped birds. Too many people felt that
    by clipping the wings, their parrots will not be able
    to fly away. Even if the clipped parrot will not
    normally fly, they have not seen what a frightened
    parrot is capable of. If the parrot is badly
    frightened, that parrot will fly out of the house.

    You must ensure total security of the flight envelope
    at home, the space that she is allowed to fly in.
    That if she is allowed out of the cage that she is
    normally kept in, she will not be able to get outside
    the area.

    When I was in Taiwan, mosquitoes give us a lot of
    problems. All apartments I was living in, and all
    apartments and houses that I visited have mosquito
    screens covering all windows and external doors. I
    presume if you are living in areas where diseases can
    be spread by mosquitoes, it is in your interest that
    you have your exterior perimeter of your house or
    apartment screened.

    Do a safety check and ensure the sliding window screen
    do not open. One morning I woke up to see a window
    screen blown opened. I turned my head to see
    Tinkerbell's cage door opened without Tinkerbell
    inside (that was during the earlier days when she
    slept in a locked cage). I nearly fainted thinking
    Tinkerbell flown away until I noticed she was in a
    corner of another room.

    That screen was permanently sealed shut with duct
    tapes to prevent it ever sliding open again. That was
    done to all screens covering the window. I smoke at
    home and it was important the screens must never be
    opened as windows are left opened.

    I also made all doors to be automatically self closing
    with counterweights and strings and hooks.

    I had no worries about the front door. The front door
    open to a sealed corridor and lift lobby. But if the
    front door open directly to outside, I would have hung
    a curtian of linked chains that would automatically
    prevent a bird from flying through. This linked chain
    curtains can also be used to restrict your parrot from
    flying into other rooms such as kitchen. Such
    curtains must be used together with your close
    observation of the bird.

    If you can have a secure perimeter that your parrot
    cannot fly away from you, you can keep a flying
    parrot. For those with clipped parrots, this secure
    perimeter is also very important for you.

    It is a fallicy to assume your clipped parrot can only
    glide and not fly. You never tested your clipped
    parrot under spooked (intense fear) conditions. You
    never know how much strength a spooked parrot is
    capable of. I have seen that !

    Within that flight area, you must check and ensure
    that it is safe for your parrot. All toilet lids are
    to be kept closed. Even better still is to ensure all
    toilet and bathroom doors are always closed in
    addition as well. You must get into the habit of
    double security.

    When cooking needs to be done with open pots of
    boiling water, I place Tinkerbell back into the cage
    until things are completed and the environment safe to
    let her out again.


    The most important factor is that you must have a
    sense of humour. If you do not have a sense of humour
    and can laugh at yourself, keeping a flying parrot
    will become a nightmare for you. Our parrots have a
    very wierd sense of humour. That can be very
    enchanting and you will learn to laugh.

    If you are those who need order and tidiness at home,
    keeping a flying parrot at home will make you tolerate
    and accept some disorder.

    If you are untidy (like me), you will learn to be more
    tidy and store things that must be stored to the best
    of your ability.

    You can take it as Gospel truth that you cannot make a
    flying parrot ever to do what she do not wish to do.

    The trick is to make the things that she likes to do
    to be what you want her to do in the first place.

    That training and how to live with a flying parrot in
    the same home will be the next rantings.

    Warmest regards

    Shanlung
     
  8. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    Tinkerbell Legacy - Having a flying parrot - Ranting
    02

    Started on evening 11 Feb 05 in cybercafe somewhere in
    VangVieng.

    Yesterday when I got here, I moved into the most
    expensive place because I was tired and liked some
    luxury. It cost 22USD, and worth 3 times more.

    Today feeling a lot better, I moved into a 4 USD
    lovely local kind of bungalow deciding to be closer to
    nature and just across the river and 700 meters
    further from town. Crossed by a bamboo and plank
    bridge and about 80 meters long and wobbles when you
    walked on it.

    Then this evening in my room that I suddenly thought
    of the absence of TV and BBC and CNN. A crescendo of
    sounds hit me from outside the hut. At least 6
    different kind of frog calls tried to compete with 2
    geckos and lots of insect calls.

    Cost by being close to nature is that to reach the
    internet cafe, I got to walk lighted up by the tinest
    crescent of moon and lights from all the stars. Yes,
    the bridge gets more wobbly at night.

    12 Feb

    Rented a motorbike for 5 usd to ride around a bit.
    Vang Vieng area is charming, rustic and more beautiful
    than I thought. I think I will stay on a few more
    days.

    Then in the evening when hack in town, saw a local pet
    parrot with wings clipped and hanging out on a string
    of fairy lights around a short column. She is small,
    looks like a ringneck but the head is purplish with a
    green body. Tail was badly plucked. This must be a
    local Laotian parrot.

    She moved away from me as I approached. So I bought a
    banana pancake, stood next the the parrot and started
    to eat. She came down and was fed bits of banana and
    pancake. She then allowed me to give her head rubs
    and beak rubs.

    She ate her fill and then moved up out of my reach.
    And here I am in another cybercafe to continue.



    Tinkerbell Legacy - Having a flying parrot - Ranting
    02

    If there are some areas in your mutual living space
    that you do not like her to go to, you need to create
    areas that you like her to go to and that she likes
    too.

    Within the flight area at home, you should provide for
    several perches and areas that she can play in. That
    will be the areas that she will normally do her toilet
    in. I had a parrot tower. There are perches I made
    for her. I placed rattan baskets with iron chains to
    weigh the basket down. The perch she loved the most
    was the very wobbly rattan cirle suspended by a rope.
    She would fly off this perch making it spin and land
    back on the spinning circle. It is strange the first
    and cheapest simplest perch I made for her was the one
    she most loved.

    If you have to chase her away, there must be a few
    places she can fly off to. You also train into her to
    fly to those alternate areas on cue. I talk on this
    after I get into clicker training.

    Then, if necessary, divert her away from some areas
    that you do not want her to go to.

    You must have bought some toys that she absolutely
    hated and kept that away. Rejoice in your good
    fortune. Those same toys will act as voodoo charm to
    ward her away from places she should not go to. I had
    a rotating floor mounted fan that she went to once. It
    was totally grilled but she shitted. I did not wanted
    a second time.

    One of the doll she feared was placed on that fan. A
    little stuffed cartoon dinosaur kept Tinkerbell away.

    Little candy stripped hula hoops, little sashimi
    bamboo roll mats were placed at forbiddened areas.

    If eventually she got over her fear, you just have to
    find new things that she does not like to keep her
    away from those areas.

    Continued 12 Feb

    There may be some areas that you tolerate her to be
    on. Sometimes when you have the energy, you chase her
    away from those areas. Sometimes, you pretend that you
    did not see her there.

    Please do not misunderstand that the parrot is always
    trying to go to forbidden places. Most of the time,
    she remained at her play areas. She may fly from one
    to another play areas. In most cases, she will fly to
    me when I call (recall training after I talk on
    clicker training). She may decide to fly to me even
    though not called. I try to be tolerant of that. If
    she is your friend, is it not all right for her to
    come to you when she felt like it? Is your friend
    only able to get to you only when you want her to come
    to you?

    I allow her to come. I talk with her for a while ,
    scratch her head and then ask her to fly away if I am
    busy. If I am not busy and can postpone whatever I do
    until later, I will play with her and allow her on my
    shoulder to watch what I am doing (allowing on
    shoulder is a subject to be trained for, in another
    letter).

    If she kept returning and I am very busy, she gets put
    back into the cage until I am free.

    She is not 24 hours out of the cage and flying about
    all the time.

    In the morning, we spend about an hour together before
    I go to the office. She then goes into the cage. Now
    and then, my wife let her out for a while. She stayed
    in the cage most of the day. After work when I get
    back, she is again out of the cage, with the door
    opened so she can go in and out as she wanted.

    Normally, she will then go out with me and my wife to
    the park or nearby school to fly in her harness for a
    while. Should we go out for dinner, she joined us
    most of the time.

    Then back in the apartment, there will be some
    training and play with her. Sometimes I choose the
    time. Sometimes she choose the time.

    Then at about 1030pm to 11 pm, I dim the lights
    indicating that she fly to her bedroom. She liked to
    sleep in my bookshelf which I screened off. When she
    go to sleep, I can cover that bookshelf and switched
    on the lights again.

    She remained in her bedroom bookshelf until she woke
    up in the morning. She never shit in her bedroom.


    The truly dangerous areas were made safe. The flight
    area is not 100% safe. There are some electic wires
    and cables about. She never seemed to go there. Most
    of the time, she was watched as a compromise.

    One very important point is that she did not know how
    to fly when she first came to me. In the first two
    weeks, I trained and trained her in 'step up' for her
    to step up on my finger. If your parrot does not step
    up for you on your finger, you should not consider
    letting her fly yet and fly in the house. Tinkerbell
    was also trained to step up on a stick.

    This is so important that you should not demean the
    'step up' in form of punishment to her. You should
    not repeatedly make her do step up to punish her.

    Your parrot must be trained to understand 'NO'. She
    will understand, but may not respect that all the
    time. More will be said later under training and
    after I describe what I perceive of their psychology.

    As a friend to a friend, there are acceptable and
    unacceptable behaviours that you can expect from your
    parrot.

    If you do catch her in an unacceptable act, you MUST
    not allow that and you must scold her immediately,
    ONLY IF YOU CATCH HER IN THE ACT. If you do not see
    her in the act and only saw the results later, DO NOT
    SCOLD HER AT ALL.

    If you are afraid of your parrot, she should not be
    allowed to fly yet. A respect for her beak is
    acceptable, but if you are afraid, that parrot must
    not fly until you trained her enough AND no longer
    afraid of her. More of this later on.

    Warmest regards

    Shanlung
     
  9. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    I am in Luang Prabang now and the Internet connection
    is much better here with faster computers. I have
    experimented with Blogging. For those interested in
    my travels, please follow the blog below

    http://www.livejournal.com/users/shanlung/2005/02/

    You can see the little parrot I talked about in
    VangVieng to be a Finsch Slaty headed parakeet that
    Roberta Kendall helped indentified.

    I will update the blog which will contain all my
    rants. So if you do not hear from me as may often be
    the case, go to my blog and feel free to add your
    thoughts and comments.




    Tinkerbell Legacy - Living with a flying parrot - Rant
    03
    23 Feb,

    After a couple of lazy days, I spend today on a couple
    of small tours.

    The first tour was a trip by boat up the Mekong river
    to Pak Ou cave 2 hours upstream with a lot of Buddhas
    in the complex. The river ride passed by largely
    forested mountains on both sides of the Mekong river.
    A couple of stops were made in local villages, one
    village specialised in making rice wine and the other
    in making paper.

    In the afternoon, a minivan brought a bunch of us to a
    Kuangsi waterfall. We reached there after an hour on
    unpaved track. A tiger cub was rescued from poachers
    in 1999 and she lived there in an enclosure since
    then. I spend half an hour looking at her and thinking
    nice thoughts to her before I continued to the
    waterfall itself. It is a pretty waterfall. From about
    100 meters up, the river split and divide itself into
    a series of tiered cascades marching down to the
    turquoise plunge pool. After that, the water spread
    out in a series of pooled terraces disappearing in the
    jungle beyond.

    I got back into town and decided to continue with
    this.


    Tinkerbell Legacy - Living with a flying parrot - Rant
    03

    Psychology and temperament of a parrot

    You are aware that parrots are so individual and may
    have different behaviour altogether. In this part, I
    refer to Tinkerbell. If we are to talk about training
    and living together, it helps if we know the mind of
    our companions.

    1. Intelligience and sense of fair play.

    Her intelligience is staggering to me. Because she
    flew about with me and interacts with me, there are
    many incidents which indicate her intelligence to the
    extent I must conclude that they are sentient as well.


    My earlier letters mentioned the way she understood
    the harness arrangements and the way she indicate to
    me how I need to improve that design. One day, I saw
    one of the two leash loop (the 9 inch long loops from
    the harness) to be out of the hook and the other leash
    loop inserted into the second hook (line hook). I
    thought that was a wierd mistake from my part until
    one day she (Tinkerbell at pavilion beyond Dragon Eye)
    took that off completely after she was extremely angry
    at me. I then realised that she must have got the two
    loops completely off and did not let me know. She was
    in the process of inserting the loop back but she used
    the wrong hook.

    I can talk of the uncanny choice of words in the right
    context when she talked with me.

    Even though she was trained to fly to me on cue and I
    mentioned I thought her "step up" from the beginning,
    that was conditional only. My son came to stay with us
    for a few weeks. Tinkerbell never flew or go to him.
    At home, I called Tinkerbell to fly to me. When she
    was on my shoulder, I cued her to step up and I moved
    to try to hand her to my son. She flew off back to my
    shoulder. I then asked her to step up and turned to my
    son. She flew off immediately to a nearby perch. I
    walked over to her as she refused to fly to me on cue
    and asked her to step up. She stepped up on my hand
    and when I turned to my son, she flew off immediately.
    She refused even to step up after that and flew to
    another room. I never tried to make her go to my son
    after that.

    I have a squirter gun that I use to reinforce "NO"
    requests to her. The unwritten code is that if she
    stopped doing the misdeeds, I cannot shoot at her. She
    was biting off the buttons from a shirt. I said "NO",
    took the gun and pointed at her and she nicely stop
    chewing and was on the verge of flying back to her
    perch. I was feeling wicked and I pull the trigger
    giving her a jet of water. She looked at me as if in
    shock and she flew to my shoulder. Now, I mentioned
    she normally will go to her designated places to shit.
    That was taught to her by praising her when she did so
    at her perches. If she shit elsewhere and we caught
    her in the act, she will be scolded. In that way, she
    was toilet trained and she knew we do not like her
    shitting elsewhere.

    She felt an injustice was done to her. On flying to my
    shoulder, she shat on me. I felt relieved as I was
    feeling guilty at firing at her. She then immediately
    flew away to my other shoulder and repeated that act ,
    flew off and hover in front of me looking at me before
    going to her perch and preen. I felt so ashamed that I
    had to apologise to her. I never crossed that line
    again.

    When we go out with her in her harness, I mentioned
    very often that never should the harness and leash be
    used to drag her or even to 'urge' her in coming to
    you. If she did not want to take off and fly to me, I
    would walk back to her, talked to her and changed the
    position to try again.

    But sometimes when there was a crowd, it was so
    tempting to pull. When I did that, she deliberately
    took off, aimed at a treee, and flew around the trunk
    twice. She did that deliberately as the line did not
    even touch the tree trunk until her second loop around
    the trunk. She then was brought short by the line and
    she went round and round and round after that. At
    other times, she knew the obstacles and she understood
    enough of the line and would fly to avoid them. She
    knew the difference between deliberate pulling and
    accidents. Sometimes when I walked away laying the
    line, I tripped or the reel snagged and she was pulled
    from the perch. In all those cases, she would fly over
    to my shoulder.

    Food treats are an important component of any
    training. However, it will be a big mistake if we
    think that our parrot are greedy Pavlovian robots.
    They do like intelligent training so that they can be
    with you doing things that both liked. I used to
    reward Tinkerbell with sunflower seeds all the time
    when she came to me on recall. Until one day, after
    she flew to me, she took the sunflower seed offered
    and threw that to the ground. She then turned her head
    in the 'head rub' posture, talked softly to me
    requesting for headrubs instead.

    A parrot is no unthinking robot. If we can agree the
    parrot is intelligent, then it is important that they
    can take an active part in the training. That our
    training to them be modified by what they want us to
    do as well, that at times, they may even be training
    us.

    If we assume we are there only as commanders and they
    as robots that must obey, or forced to obey us, we
    look at them to see only if they obey us or not. If we
    use that kind of mental approach, we will miss seeing
    their body languages and behaviour to the cues we
    give. We then only see that they did not obey without
    ever seeing their body language as to why they do not
    do so. We can try and try and try and blame everyone
    for the failure and never know the reasons that our
    parrots are trying to tell us about.

    Such alpha wannabees can never ever have the joy and
    warmth of a real friendship either.

    In having and living with a flying parrot that can
    never be forced, your only chance for success must be
    based on friendship and equality with her. Only then
    will you notice their body language and nuances with
    the clarity that will come to you.



    2. Parrots are empaths.

    I am convinced that parrots sensed our emotions.

    When I got back from the office, the reaction I got
    from Tinkerbell will be different very much as if she
    knew the mood I was in. If I felt the day was bad for
    me, she would fly over to me and settle herself on my
    shoulder to preen herself or my hair or give gentle
    nibbles on my ear. I chill out with a drink with her
    on best behaviour on my shoulder.

    If I got back with a happy mood, she would fly to me
    screaming at me. She then will snatch the packet of
    cigarettes from my pocket and fly off to top of the
    cupboard to tear them apart. She ignores all my "no"s.
    As I recognised this as a game from her, I never
    threatened her with the squirt gun. I chased her and
    she allowed herself to be caught eventually. Or she
    would snatched my keys , fly around looking for
    Halftail the cat or Zorro my ferret to divebomb them
    until I intervene.

    I tried to fool her by pretending to be happy when I
    was not or pretending to be sad. She read me correctly
    at all times. Perhaps she may have seen our facial and
    body expressions. Perhaps she may sense the emotions
    at some other level.

    This became a very important part in our interactions
    and training. To think of training as some Pavlovian
    conditionting demeans them and us.

    When I train her and she did it well, I was happy of
    course. I also project mentally to her of my happiness
    and my words to her reflect that feeling of happiness.
    If she did something that is REALLY BAD, I allow anger
    and unhappiness to flow out of me to her. It is a
    mistake and I believe very confusing to parrot to be
    hypocritical in our actions and thoughts.


    If you caught the parrot doing something bad that
    displeases you, it is very important to be honest
    about it to them. Sweet words and murderous thoughts
    will be confusing to them. Which is another reason why
    I mentioned earlier that if she did something bad and
    you did not see that act being done, you should just
    clean up or fix it and do not even think of it after
    that.

    I am not advocating punishment or something fearful to
    your parrot as part of any training. Tinkerbell is not
    afraid of the squirt gun at all. She even love to play
    games with me involving the squirt gun. She would do
    something that she knew is 'bad' by my defination. She
    even called out to me "Tinkerbell is a bad girl" to
    let me know she was doing something bad. She knew the
    gun must be aimed before it is effective. She would
    wait until I almost aimed the gun at her before she
    flew off rapidly and zigzag herself out of line of
    fire to perch herself on top of the gun and bob at me
    as if it was a big game.

    She also trained me. When she was thirsty, there were
    some very specific signals and calls that she wanted
    water. Sometimes, I failed to notice her signals
    especially if she was on my shoulder and I lost in
    thoughts on other matters. My wife would notice her
    signals but would keep quiet, out of her morbid
    curiosity as to what she would do. Tinkerbell would
    then nip my ear as if to call my attention, and then
    repeat her request for water.

    I do not ever think she was punishing me and her nips
    were just to get my attention. For all I know, she may
    have 'borrowed' that from me into her own way of
    training me.

    The relationship between Tinkerbell and me was a
    feisty and robust one where we screamed together in
    happiness and with a lot of play and laughter.

    If your parrot is very sensitive and fearful, then you
    must first win their confidence with patience. This is
    something that you can do with clicker training that I
    will talk more on later. I consider all aggressive
    parrots to be very fearful and sensitive. I cannot
    imagine any parrot biting you with deliberate malice.
    They will give so many body signals that you may have
    ignored.

    I mentioned before that you must not fear your parrot.
    You can respect their beak, but must never fear them.
    I do feel if you have fear for them, they may felt or
    sensed or read your fear and misunderstood your fear
    for them. The parrot may be even more frightened by
    your fear and you end up getting bitten.



    Shanlung


    =====
    With warmest regards

    Shanlung - lackey to all below
    Joy - wife, Tinkerbell - CAG, daughter and love of my heart
    Halftail the Bimbo - beautiful sweet silly cat
    Zorro - ferret which loves parrot pellets
    Bim and Zor are with other loving families now
    Tinkerbell in safe keeping of Yu and family
    I will remember them for the happy times they gave me

    earlier emails and photo links on Tink -
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9
     
  10. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    (refer to blog for earlier descriptions of Vernal Hanging Parrot
    http://www.livejournal.com/users/shanlung/ )


    Tinkerbell Legacy - Training of Vernal Hanging Parrot Rant 05

    At 4 pm today 28 Feb, I got back from the Plain of Jars. I should write about that,
    but something else occurred today that I should write about first.

    An hour before the tour bus brought us back to Luang Prabang, I was thinking
    about the two vernal hanging parrots that I observed in Somjith guest house that
    I stayed in. Later closer observations showed that one of the parrot is clipped
    and cannot fly. But by climbing about on the plants and fence, I earlier thought
    it could fly as well. With the other parrot flying in and out with lots of activities
    between those two, I did thought both could fly.

    Often, the clipped parrot would be in its tiny cage. The flighted parrot periodically
    dropped by. There was one particularly touching moment. The caged parrot exhausted the
    food in its cage. The flighted parrot flew to the cage and regurgitate the food and fed
    his mate in the cage.

    Riding in the bus, I thought I try to make some differences for those two parrots. That
    determined I will stay in Somjith GH again. As I went in, the landlord son, about 25 years old
    greeted me with happiness. He told me my old room is available as I told him I would be back
    today. I accepted, he took my bag up, and I ordered a cup of good Laos coffee from her sister. I will call him as LS

    I had printed namecards with different pictures of Tinkerbell on it. Later, I realised I could not give
    the namecards away without losing those picutres to show other people. He had seen those
    pictures of Tinkerbell flying to me and he was so excited before I left for the plain of jars.

    When he came down to me again, I asked him if he like me to advise him. He smiled from ear to ear
    and nodded his head vigorously up and down. I told him about Tinkerbell web page
    at
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9

    I told him details of the harness design and how to make it is located there with training.

    I was determined to start LS on the road to friendship with his parrots. I then asked
    him if his clipped parrot respond to "step up" and I explained to him the importance of this. His
    eyes opened wide and LS said he never did such thing. I expected that answer from him. I have studied his clipped parrot when I could earlier.

    She appeared to be a brave girl. I approached her when she was out of the cage. She would allow me to within a certain distance and then backed off from me. I reached my hand out slowly, she moved off slowly leaving a 2 foot gap. When I retrieved my hand, she came towards me following my hand. I thought she will be a good candidate to do " step up".

    He got her out of the cage as requested holding her cupped between his palms. I asked him to release her and she clambered out of the palm to the forearm. I was softly talking to her all the time. I took a good look at her, noticed her beauty, and while thinking of her as a beautiful parrot with rich green feathers, I moved my right hand slowly to her with my index finger under her breast. I pressed on to her and said 'step up'. I pressed on slowly as if to move my finger and scooping her up. She responded hesitantly but she stepped up.

    I complimented her and told her what a good girl she was and continued to talk to her. After a while, I used my left hand and asked her to step up again. She responded immediately. LS smiled and smiled at me. I explained to him to place his finger below her breast and sweep slowly while telling her to step up.

    I could see he was eager and yet frightened to do so. His finger came hestitantly, and withdrew , and came on, and withdrew. He had a fear of getting bitten, and I sensed she sensed it too. Her danger signals were so obvious to me. That tiny girl lunged and took a nip at his finger. He withdrew in shock.

    I explained to him he MUST not fear her as his own fear may trigger that response. I explain explicitly what he must do. I played with her and after a few minutes , he tried again. His action was firmer and when his finger came with that cue, I also rotated my finger so she had to step up on his finger.

    His eyes lighted up with that simple move. I watched LS and the parrot played. I knew I will definately let both of them become good friends. I watched LS interactions and that parrot response. I showed him how to recognise when the parrot did not like his attempts to stroke her head and he must stopped if the parrot did not like it. I got her to step up on me. I told her slowly that she would love head rubs and extended my finger slowly to her tiny head. I lightly touched her and let go. I slowly repeated that and she liked it, extending her head to my finger. LS took over and was so delighted to do that.

    He then tried repeated cues of step up. I told him that should not be done. I took her and showed him to do a 'step up' onto my shoulder. She was so small that I had no worries of bite to my face. I also know she would not do that to me. He was very excited again with this. LS got her back and introduced her to his shoulder.

    I took her back. I deliberately placed my right index finger to her beak. I wanted to induce her to bite me. At that time, my right thumb was close to her beak as well. When she gave me a nip, I loudly told her "NO!" and at the same time, used the thumb to push her beak away before any damage could be done.

    I then explained to him that he must take her out everyday and spend time with her. That he must do it in the morning, the afternoon and the evening. I exxplained to LS the relationships between friends. No punishment to be ever inflicted on her. If she did things that friends should not do, she must be told immediately. Just like what I had done when she bite me. She cannot fly now. But if ever she does, it is important to spend time with her now. I then placed her on a rattan basket on the table. To show that she could be placed down and she stayed and played on that basket. I pointed out to him he could hang that rattan fish trap from my balcony and she could play there and be near him.


    He smiled and spoke to me with conviction in his voice that he will be doing that.

    I smiled back too. I believe his relationship with the parrot will changed and she
    will never go hungry and neglected again

    I will see what he will do tomorrow.



    Shanlung
     
  11. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    Tinkerbell Legacy - VH parrot and Clicker Training Rant 06
    Tinkerbell Legacy - VH parrot and Clicker Training Rant 06

    You MUST know more about clicker training. You can get more information
    from two very good groups on clicker training for parrots. I urge you to join
    one or both the groups below.

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/clickbirds

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Bird-Click

    Today will be my last day in Luang Prabang. I will be going on a 5 day trip by river
    and other transport deeper into less travelled regions of Laos. I wonder now
    if I will find Internet cafes as well.

    For earlier encounters and photos of that Vernal Hanging parrots, please refer to my blog
    for entries prior to 26 Feb.
    http://www.livejournal.com/users/shanlung/

    Yesterday was another day with LS and the VH parrot. He picked up the lesson very well. I am pleased
    to report that it was much easier to take her out this time. He also decided to give her a name. Folks, she is now called TieuTieu. Tieu is Laotian for green. TT will refer to TieuTieu.

    I told him that TT is likely to moult and be fully flighted within 3 months. He told me he will not clip the wings and take this 3 months period to try to bond tightly with her. Since the mate hang around making periodic visits to TT, LS was ready to have both of them as fliers with him or let them leave. As the VH parrots are local parrots, they will just go back to natural living. He agreed that with me after I spend an evening talking and indoctrinating him in clicker training. He recognised in clicker training he will have the tools to bond and do recalls with TT in the future. I made him repeat back to me in his own words to make sure he had the basics of clicker training as English is not his best language.

    That brought me to clicker training. Clicker training is much more than what I will be writting here. That is why it is better for you to join the groups I mentioned above.

    Your parrot may be frightened and bite you or bored and unable to communicate with you or you want to teach your parrot tricks to interact with her. You can also lead your parrot into new activities and new behaviours in place of behaviours you do not wish her to do. It is a truth enshrined in stone that you can never force a parrot to do what she does not wish to do. But you can teach her new behaviours that she likes to do instead.

    Then you have little choice but to turn to clicker training.

    What is clicker training. The best book to start with will the the book "Do not shoot the dog" written by Karen Pyror. Do get your hands on this book.

    A clicker is an inexpensive toy that children play with. When you press this, it will make a loud clicking sound like that of a cricket. If you do not have a clicker, you can use anything that makes a consistent clicking sound like that of a ball point pen.

    When you want your bird to do something. you must have the means to let your bird knows that what she is doing is correct and something that you wanted. You can just say 'good girl', or 'yes'. However, your voice may differ from time to time. You need a sound that will be exactly the same every time, and that is why you use the clicker especially at the very beginning. The clicker sound will be the cue to her that what she did was correct. The act of clicker training also meant you must observe her to a level you probably never did before. You will know more of her body language and behaviour then before.

    At a different level, you are communicating directly to the bird. This communication works both ways to me. Your bird will also know you are trying to communicate to her and she can use this way to communicate to you. I go more into this later.

    Any tricks you have seen performed consist of a series of actions. You can split the actions, train her one at a time. You indicate via the clicker that she is correct and later join those series of actions into an act that you can cue her to do.

    Your parrot should be weaned and taking solid food before you do the clicker training.

    KNOWING HER FAVOURITE FOOD.

    After she is weaned and taking solid food, there must be something that she absolutely like to eat. Make a note of that and stop giving that to her regularly. Her favourite food will be kept separate from the rest of her diet and given to her as treats and when you are doing clicker training with her. This special food will be used for the next phase of what we term ' Conditioning the Clicker'.

    It has been said that it is better to restrict the feeding of the parrot so she will be hungry and more ready to 'work' for her treats. When I first saw my Tinkerbell, she was digging in a dish of sunflower seeds husks chewed almost to powder. There and then, I made a mental promise that never ever will I let her be hungry again. She had food constantly available at all times. I never felt any problems with her. In case of misunderstanding from LS, I never let him know this point of food restriction. TT is so small and not likely to have much fat reserves. Food restriction is a fine line from starvation.



    CONDITIONING OF THE CLICKER

    Your parrot now need to know that the clicker, or more accurately, the sound of the clicker is a good sound. It does not matter if she is in or not in the cage. So if your parrot is a biter and kept in the cage, this is a good way to make peace with her.

    You called her\his name, press the clicker, and give her a bit of her favourite food or treat. That is all to it.
    Then you leave her alone or talk to her or play with her. After a while, you press the clicker and give her the treat again. At her level, she hears the clicker sound and she gets something she likes to eat. She will get the idea that the clicker sound is a good sound.

    It does not matter if she does not come to you and in her cage. Press the clicker and place the treat in her bowl. You can talk to her or walk away.

    Please do not view this as a form of Pavlovian conditioning. You demean your parrot as an unthinking automaton and you demean yourself. Are your university or other education a form of Pavlovian conditioning for yourself? This is your bridge to understanding with your parrot and a portal into her mind. At a later stage, you will realised that this clicker training is a portal into her mind.



    You should not rush this process of conditioning the clicker. Neither should you remain too long at this stage.

    For a minimum of a week, you will walk up to your parrot, call her name, click the clicker and give her a treat. That should be done at irregular intervals. This is to let your parrot knows that sound is a good sound. If your parrot is fearful of you at the beginning, I would think in a week or so, she will accept the treat from your hand without trying to bite you.

    Since they are very intelligent you must move on are they may get bored. So not later than 2 weeks, you should move on to TOUCH TARGET.


    TOUCH TARGET


    Touch target is the next important exercise. You can get a small stick which will be called the target.

    In many cases, you can use a chopstick. However as I do use chopsticks to eat with, that will not be a practical target for me. Tinkerbell may fly to me in the middle of a dinner to 'touch target\. As I seldom drink, I use a cocktail stirrer. But if you do that, make sure your friends request cocktails that are shaken and not stirred.

    You hold that target near her head. Her normal reaction will be to bite that stick. You get ready for that. When her beak touches that stick, you click to let her know that her action is what you wanted, and then you give her the treat.

    You noticed the timing is so important. Giving of treat is somewhat delayed. But by using the click just at the point of her action, she will know the action is what you want even if the food is given later.

    This was what happened to me amd very significant to myself and may be interesting to you.

    When I approached Tinkerbell for the first time with the target, I was slightly nervous about it.
    I kept my mind quiet and extend my senses to her. I had been doing martial arts and meditation for many years and much into combat taijichuan.

    What was striking was that she looked at the target, reached out to touch it, and I clicked just at that moment. She then looked at me, and at that point, I knew that she knew that I knew, as if for a moment, there was a mind to mind connection between the two of us, that I was trying to communicate to her. Later on when I get to distance recall training, I will talk more on this mind to mind.

    I hope it may be the same with you. You are done with clicker conditioning and on the first use of the clicker to communicate intent. You just relax, place the target near her, and wait for her to touch it. When she does so and you click, maybe you can sense that too.

    Do not forget to pour your happiness in your heart together with that clicker sound. I do not know, but I strongly suspect that matters as much if not more than the treat itself.

    You then place your target a bit higher to make her stretch to touch target. You click and treat.
    You place that target to the left, up, and down. You click and treat at all times.

    This target and clicker will the the key to other training.

    But I need to go and get ready for my long trip and I need to end now.


    Warmest regards

    Shanlung
     
  12. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    Tinkerbell Legacy - Final Rant - Bringing it all
    together

    13 April 12 noon

    I am sitting in a cyber cafe in Chang Mai and I am
    soaking wet. I decided to take a temporary refuge
    from the Songkran festival which started officially
    today and which will end 3 days later on Friday. I had
    known of this festival for a long time, even thought
    of coming here for it but never did until this year.
    My wife Joy was to have joined me here (in case you
    are wondering) but she got caught up in some work in
    Singapore.

    I marked myself as a combatant by carrying a small
    bucket to drench anyone drenchable and in turn was
    cleansed of misfortunes by an assortment of water
    blasters, buckets and pails wielded by others. The
    water can be directly from the moat which surround the
    old Changmai city, may even be purified by special
    water treatment trucks and likely to have ice blocks
    in it. As the temperature is about 35 C, it can get
    very refreshing.

    This is the most important Thai festival and celebrate
    their New Year.

    See
    http://www.travelinsights.org/writing/songkran.html
    for a more complete description of this festival (a
    site I picked randomly)

    I also thought I should bring to a conclusion the
    legacy of Tinkerbell.

    I had written earlier of clicker training and of the
    target stick. For more details of clicker training,
    it is strongly advised you join either of the two
    clicker training groups that I mentioned before.

    The training that you will be doing together with your
    charge is a long term process. It is also a daily
    process. It is not so much as to training but a
    bonding that you do with your charge. In my view,
    they understand you much better than you may
    understand them. The training should not be a
    mechanical process that with enough repeats, you can
    get them to do things immediately like clockwork.
    Perhaps that can be done. But ask yourself, will that
    be enjoyable to her? and to you? that you can proceed
    to do such unenjoyable procedures on a daily basis?
    It is far better to have a routine that both likes and
    look forward to. If you got a flying bird, if she
    does not like it, it will not be possible to make her
    do it. It is much more important to keep it
    interesting enough for her to like what you are doing
    with her. Many repeats one after another is not going
    to fit that most important requirement.

    Life must be more than mindless rote training on
    either side.

    Clicker training session with Tinkerbell consisted of
    maybe 25% clicker training intersperse with lots of
    talking and headrubs. That may be sessions of 5 to 10
    minutes long and about twice or three times a day.
    The daily outdoor flights with her were part of the
    training but not considered as clicker training here.

    With that 'touch target' technique, you are onto a lot
    of other tricks that you can teach her.

    I bought those different color and shape baby toys
    with the thought of teaching her color and shapes. I
    laid them out in front of her, use the target stick to
    touch one of them and told her to touch target. She
    immediately knew it was not the stick and the block
    being referred to. I had visions of getting her to
    pick up objects by verbally telling her the color and
    shape and she getting that right and dropping into the
    container. It went so well that first session that I
    thought it was going to be too easy.

    She picked up the blocks as indicated by the target
    stick. She got clicked and treat a few times. I
    placed out my hand and told her to drop it there. She
    walked up to my hand and placed it. She got clicked
    and treat. What happened was a quirk of fate.
    HalfTail my cat and Zorro my ferret were also let out
    to play on the floor and they happened to be there at
    that time. The block slipped from my hand and fell
    near HT. HT had a fright and jumped up.

    Tinkerbell thought it was so much fun to frighten poor
    HT even if that first time was an accident. At the
    next request to pick up the block with the target
    stick, she did that and deliberately threw it down
    near HT. HT had another fright and ran away. Tink
    then took another block and flew to aim at HT. I got
    excited myself and added my emotions to the situation
    and Tink felt it was a great game she got on to,
    taking blocks and hurling at HT and Zorro.

    That ended the attempts to teach Tink to pick up
    blocks. That was another reason why I felt parrots,
    or at least Tink is an empath able to pick up
    emotions. I did not feel it fair (and I was too lazy)
    to want to lock up HT and Zorro everytime I teach
    Tink. Everytime I took out the blocks, she would pick
    one to throw at HT or to fly with it to bomb HT. That
    was Tink's interpretation which I could not correct or
    bring myself to correct.

    I store those blocks away. But perhaps you may have
    better luck with that especially if you do not have
    other pets around to act as distraction.

    My main aim at that time was to get Tink to fly back
    to me on cue. I focused on 'touch target'. But with
    variations of touching the target stick. To get her
    to bend up and bend down and walk or fly to the target
    stick was too easy. I had to use more complex
    variations to keep her interest. You can see that in
    an old letter together with photos of her doing that.
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/clicker-L-tinktouchtarget.html


    This 'touch target' was the basis of how I taught her
    to fly back to me on recall.
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/w8recalltraining.htm

    The above URL is an earlier letter that I wrote on
    recall training. Even if your parrot does not fly as
    yet, you should teach them recall training even if
    they walk to you now. You get them into the habit of
    coming to you when you call them. When they can fly,
    it will be that much easier.

    If your parrot do not fly now, it may be possible to
    get them to fly later when new flight feathers are
    grown. This may not be a definate thing. If your
    parrot had not been allowed to fledge and fly for a
    few weeks before the feathers were clipped and if they
    are many years old now, they may not even fly after
    the flight feathers are grown again.

    You cannot teach them how to fly. After all, you
    cannot fly yourself. BUT, you can give them a very
    safe environment for them to practise their first
    flights. The first flights can be very scary for them
    and for yourself. It was scary for me and very
    painful to watch her hit the walls and slide down. If
    I had to do that again, I would have prepared a
    special room with nettings along the walls for her to
    cling to.

    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wflyindoor1.html

    Above URL is another earlier letter on teaching your
    parrot to fly indoors.

    After your parrot is flying about inside your house
    and coming to you on recalls, you need to take her to
    fly in much bigger enclosed areas. If you live in a
    huge mansion, you should also take her to that bigger
    enclosed areas. You need to let her really stretch
    her wings safely and you need to gain the temperament
    and confidence in yourself and her. Your fear can
    affect her and this is a vital step before attempting
    harness on outside.

    Go into Tinkerbell webpages and read all that I wrote
    under the main category of "Tinkerbell and her
    semi-free flights in large building" . You may find
    the mistakes I made so you need not repeat them. Most
    of all, you and her will have the fun of it.

    With successful recalls in big enclosed areas, you can
    now think of taking her out in harness.

    Do read what I think of harness usage in "Using
    Harness"
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wUsingHarness.html

    Your parrot must be ready to wear the harness. To
    wear the harness, she must allow you to stroke and
    touch her all over. If your parrot likes head rubs,
    you use that as a starting point. While giving her
    head rubs. extend your other fingers to stroke her
    back. At any point when she does not like, stop and
    do not go on and get back to just head rubs. Slowly,
    you get to stroke her wings, and under her wings, her
    back, and her stomach. Take it easy and as a game
    with her. You got many many more months and years
    ahead of you. Do not stress her or yourself.

    Read all the letters I wrote on harness design. Each
    of those letters have been chronologically written
    with increment on the design but building up on
    earlier knowledge.

    The very first letter setting out the principles of
    Tinkerbell harness is the most important of the
    harness letter
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/harness1.html

    Even letters without harness in it contain matters
    relating to harness and touches on or was the
    foundation to later changes in harness.

    The final letter on harness "Tinkerbell - Harness for
    Dennis" gave the photo by photo stages of the last
    version of Tinkerbell harness.
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wtinkharnessdennis.htm

    When I was out with Tinkerbell, I used two harnesses
    with her all the time. The first was the visible
    harness and line used more to reassure me that she
    could not spook and fly away. The second and most
    important harness and line is the verbal connections I
    maintained with her. I talked to her to reassure her
    and that was what kept her with me.

    In outside recalls, and indoor recalls, or anything I
    need of her for that matter, I always talked with her
    until I felt she was ready to do that and then and
    only then, I gave the cue. If her eyes were not on me
    and mentally she not with me, I try not to cheapen the
    cue by using it. The cue should only be used when you
    know it would be effective.

    There had been distinct times when I knew we were in
    mental connections (Please do not quote that con-man
    former magician and former escapologist Randi as if he
    is the final arbiter (read some of the articles I
    found on Randi in the links in
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/randi.html and
    demand I write a 'scientific paper' the way I was
    demanded to do after I wrote of Ivan my cat in
    "Tinkerbell Legacy - Start"
    http://www.livejournal.com/users/shanlung/1564.html
    and specifically in
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/ivan1.html

    In the late evenings with Tinkerbell been recalled
    from over 30 meters away, I could not see her from
    that distance. I talked to her for a while and
    somehow I knew she was with me and I gave recall cue.
    And at that point in time, I knew she would take
    flight to me. If you have played at darts, there are
    some shots that felt sweet and that you know will hit
    exactly the point that you wanted the moment that dart
    left your finger. There is no mistaking that feeling.
    When you miss the mark, you never ever get that sweet
    feeling.

    I need not raise my voice in that distance, but I
    knew that she knew. Its just a strange mental feeling
    that happened in about one in every 3-4 recalls when I
    could not see her. Perhaps I noticed visual aspects
    in that distant grey on grey. Perhaps I just did
    know. And your choice to interprete as you like.

    That same person demanding that I submit a 'scientific
    paper' mentioned that she got bitten by her parrot as
    she tried to take note of the pinning of the eye
    before the bite. Now, the eyes may pin before the
    bite. The eyes may also pin very quickly before the
    bite. BUT, before the pinning of eyes, there are so
    many shades of feeling that the parrot will exhibit,
    that she is nervous, that she is unhappy, that she is
    very very unhappy, then they pin the eyes and bite.
    It is just sad that those entire range of emotional
    display from a parrot can be blissfully ignored and
    not taken noticed of.

    That is why I kind of insisted that you treat the
    parrot as friends and not something to be 'trained'
    and that you are the 'alpha' and commander.

    Before that, that had been occasional times I forgot
    to hook the line to the harness. I am sure she knew,
    but she never flew off from me and I had the feeling
    she was amused when I realised to my fright she was
    not hooked. It even got to a stage that harness and
    hooking of line was incorporated into a verbal check
    with my wife before we walked out of the apartment.

    And this is not something I encourage. In the last
    month before I left Taiwan, when I reached my
    apartment and before I go inside. I removed
    Tinkerbell's harness when we were in the open. That
    was done rather deliberately by me. She knew she was
    free. But she flew back to me from her motorbike
    perch and we walked into the apartment.


    Warmest regards

    Shanlung


    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/
     
  13. laura

    laura Guest

    häh?kann mir das jemand mal in zwei drei sätzen erklären????
     
  14. Karl

    Karl Foren-Guru

    Dabei seit:
    13. Februar 2005
    Beiträge:
    810
    Zustimmungen:
    1
    Ort:
    21785 Neuhaus/ Oste
    Wenn ich das richtig verstanden habe,läßt er seinen Geier am Drahtseil fliegen und hat ihn mit clicker-training so konditioniert,daß der Papagei mit dem Seil umgehen kann.Weiß nicht,ob das so toll ist...
     
  15. Anja12

    Anja12 Foren-Guru

    Dabei seit:
    2. September 2003
    Beiträge:
    3.700
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    Ort:
    Neuss
    und er hält ihn in Einzelhaltung, wenn ich das richtig verstanden habe :nene: :traurig:
     
  16. laura

    laura Guest

    oh-je,was für ein scheiss!mehr fällt mir dazu nicht ein!hoffendlich macht das keiner nach und wir müssen noch von strangulierten vögeln hier lesen :(
     
  17. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    Tinkerbell Legacy - Rant 08 How to avoid getting badly bitten by your bird

    Tinkerbell Legacy - Rant 08 How to avoid getting badly bitten by your bird

    Sorry if I mislead you by calling the last rant to be a final rant. Looks like I have got more to say.


    This is a letter made a couple of days ago on 9 May that you may find useful if your parrot or cockatoo or macaw bites you.

    I will not mention which group that was as it is unlikely you find me there again. The vast majority of people there are nice as usual. The one I addressed to is nice and so is the other mentioned in the letter.

    But there is one who knows so little and who think she knew everything.

    Saying that I use a chainsaw to cut butter while she uses a knife? Why ? because she THINKS that she knew clicker training and took acception that I never mentioned that in this particular letter.


    She then claimed I am angling for praise and her crony jumped in saying I am there to boast.

    There are better things for me to do in life.

    =========================================================

    To Groovy's Mom,

    Thank you for writing directly to me that you enjoyed those episodes I wrote of Tinkerbell and her training in her webpage
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9

    I was hesitant at the beginning of stepping in. No matter how detailed you wrote of your problems, at best it will be a snapshot and important details may have been left out making it difficult to advise you to avoid further biting especially as you are one of those rare person keeping a flighted Goffin. You definately have a sense of humour as it is unimaginable to me otherwise. No one without a sense of humour can ever keep a flighted parrot or 2 or macaw at home.

    Being a mom and FRIEND with Groovy, it is important that unacceptable behaviour be dealt with firmly. I have no difficulties with your use
    of of your spray bottle to reinforce your NOs. Heck! I had a water blaster to wave about to let her know her occasional fragrant disregards for my NOs do have consequences. I do believe that make for overall amicable living in somewhat harmony.

    I agree with Angie that the fly swatter should not be used, but for reasons very different from hers.

    I do believe that Groovy and you love each other. Groovy may be taking her cues how to treat you from how you treat her. I do not think Groovy fear that swatter unlike Angie. But Groovy may think a more robust relationship with you may be ok just as you are more robust with her (even if you never did use it on her).

    I do not think you want that trend to continue. A firm NO together with mental outpouring of anger will be enough. Wave that spray bottle for emphasis if you need more. If bad behaviour persist, cage time should be mandatory.

    It will be a bad mistake to pussy foot around fearing to upset them bearing your pain in silence. As I have said, they read our emotions. If you remain outwardly nice and inside an emotional turmoil, you will confuse them.

    If you read those episodes with Tinkerbell, you will read now and then she gave me manicure. It is interesting why that happened. Even with our relationship, I was very wary at first when she got on my shoulders. I would put my hand up between her and my face to control her beak just in case. I also thought it to be a good idea in case she got bored and want to bite, I rather let her bite my fingers than my cheek. Instead, she got on to giving my fingers a good manicure.

    Do take care if Groovy want to snuggle to your face especially when you relate he might bite you. Do read what I wrote about training parrot 'Parrot on shoulder being gentle'.
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wbeinggentle.html

    I never stick or wave my fingers silently under the beak or around the eyes of Tinkerbell or any parrot. I was stupid enough to do that to her at the beginning, but since then, never.

    I may look ugly now from my photos. But long long time ago when I was 3 -4 years old, I was incredibly cute. My sisters and her friends loved to hug me and pinch my cute cheeks, to my immense disgust at that time. I did tell them I did not like it, but it seemed what they liked determined what they could do.

    So everytime I raised my finger to Tinkerbell's head, I would tell her I am going to give a head rub or beak rub. I watched her. If she bowed her head or hold steady, it would be ok with her. If she withdrew slightly, that meant she did not want my head rubs or beak rubs at that time. So I do my thing and ask again later.

    It is a matter of courtesy and respect to tell them what we like to do. And pay attention to their response before we proceed.

    There have been this talk about watching eyes pinning as an indication that they may attack. We might as well watch that they open their beaks before they bite you.

    I do not know about eye pinning. But they indicate their moods and if you are observant enough, you know their likes and dislikes. If you watch them enough, you will see so many shades of likes and dislikes that you will never bother to look for eyes pinning. I am not even certain if their eyes pinned before they bite. Perhaps that is another fallacy such as height placement and their behaviour.

    If they indicate dislike, that should be enough for you to desist and not push them to the point that they bite you.

    If it is a bird that I am not familiar with, I talk to them, telling them how nice they are and feeling the words in my heart. When I extend my right index finger for head rub/beak rub, my right thumb is prepared to push on the lower beak near the head if a bite occur and withdrawing my finger. So far, so good. I have not been bitten even by 2s and macaws that I was warned are biters. I gave them time and talked to them and let them warm to me. I also do take precautions thereby not fearing them which may trigger a bite because of the fear itself.

    If you read my letters, from now and then, I mention I do martial arts, a lot of martial arts.

    In training my friend who looked after Tinkerbell, I had to train him and his family in case of bites. Their thumbs may not be as fast as mine.

    I told them to hold their right index finger with their left hand very hard. If they pull their right hand away, it would be difficult just as if a bite occured. And the beaks may grind and grind.

    If instead, they push their right index finger towards the wrist of the left holding hand at 30 degree and rotate the right index finger against the thumb of the holding hand such that the right palm is now facing upwards, the grip will be broken. Get your husband or boyfriend to grip you hard on your wrist or your index finger. You will find it difficult to pull away. If you push your wrist or finger downwards and rotate it in a smooth motion, you break free without hurting him.

    In the same way, instead of pulling away from the bite, you push towards the chest of the bird and rotate your hand. Yes, Tink after the first 2 weeks of honeymoon, was a biter. But I was glad my years of martial arts did help me. Then, we bonded and played and a different story emerged.

    I hope now you respect the beak, but not fear the beak anymore.

    As to your enquiry about commercial harness, I must advise you strongly against commercial harness. Do take your time with Tinkerbell webpage and read what I wrote on harness including my philosophy on them, how to make them and how to put them on and when you should do that.

    There are so many details without which the use of harness can be very dangerous.

    Good ideas are a dime a dozen as you will find out eventually with those commercial harness and flightsuits. You just try threading tiny buckles on moving body with sharp beaks and all I taught earlier about avoiding beaks will be futile.

    Or worse, they make use of those spring loaded thingy wingy to hold them together. Tinkerbell can open them in one second flat. Have you walked on a mist shrouded ledge with forests around and a drop of 300 meters and hear the click when the spring loaded thingy wingy was opened and the leash released when your beloved parrot is on your shoulder?

    That happened to me as you can read in
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/harness4.html

    Harness is not a cure all. There are specific conditions that apply.

    You have a long time ahead with Groovy. Do take the time to read the details that hopefully will make your living with Groovy even more enjoyable than my lving with Tinkerbell.

    Warmest regards

    Shanlung

    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9

    =================================================

    This is the letter I wrote when she claimed I use a chainsaw to cut butter while she uses a knife. She never bothered to tell me about that knife chosing to give a tirade from a different direction. Jumping instead to what I wrote that it is ok to wave that spray bottle just as I wave my water blaster.

    You have read and known of the context that is done. I am more than willing to be cruxified by you as I know you knw all about me.

    But from one who does not know and think she knew?




    That is when I decided the lowest denominator wins. I just rather not be there again.




    -----------------------------------

    xxxxx,

    When I see someone in the water struggling to stay afloat, I do not think teaching that person how to swim is appropriate. That person needed a ring thrown over.

    When a person is afraid of being bitten and the wings of a bird is at risk, I do want to try my best to save both.

    I am fascinated by your proclaimed admiration for the work you said I have done with my birds. I just wonder what do you know about what I have done as it is so obvious that you have not read about it.

    If you had, clicker training, or the knife you love to compare with the chainsaw, is so evident as the foundation of all that I have done in almost everything I have written. Since Groovy Mom is reading those earlier letters in Tinkerbell webpage, I know that she is fully aware of how important clicker training is, at least to what I have done with Tinkerbell.

    When others, including yourself, mentioned clicker training, I thought I need not add more.

    But perhaps I am totally wrong. You have this wonderful knife that I missed while I lug around a chain saw to cut butter.

    So do tell me more of that knife of yours.

    Shanlung



    -----------------------------------------------
     
  18. #17 coco`s papa, 11. Mai 2005
    coco`s papa

    coco`s papa Always Hardcore

    Dabei seit:
    3. Mai 2005
    Beiträge:
    135
    Zustimmungen:
    0
    man ist der typ bescheuert ... wenn er was an einem seil fliegen lassen will soll er sich nen drachen kaufen ...
     
  19. Karl

    Karl Foren-Guru

    Dabei seit:
    13. Februar 2005
    Beiträge:
    810
    Zustimmungen:
    1
    Ort:
    21785 Neuhaus/ Oste
    Das ist wie ein Hund,der nie von der Leine darf.Ich weiß nicht:Wenn er nur im Zwinger sitzt,geht es ihm dann besser?Ist Alina´s Methode des Freiflugs besser?Das ist eine philosophische Frage,mit der ich noch nicht durch bin. Gefangenschaft ist Gefangenschaft...

    Gruß vom Karl
     
  20. Anzeige

    schau mal hier [hier klicken]. Bestimmt findest du dort etwas feines.
    Registrieren bzw. einloggen, um diese und auch andere Anzeigen zu deaktivieren
  21. #19 hansklein, 12. Mai 2005
    hansklein

    hansklein Guest

    Hi, hab bisschen wat verstanden...

    Also der Typ meint, dass wir unsere Geier einfach mit entsprechendem Training frei fliegen lassen können... Mit dem Risiko, dass der Falke in Germany ei bisschen schneller ist... Fast verloren Da hat er seinen Geier fast verloren... Das ganze mit Klicker- und Koordinationstraining.... Naja, ich lass ihm seine Meinung...

    Grüße

    Hans und Geier
     
  22. shanlung

    shanlung Guest

    Harness for flighted parrots - To Nick and folks

    This is not just for people with flighted parrots. This is also for people with clipped parrots who may like to take them out.


    The assumption people made that as their parrots are clipped they cannot fly away. This assumption is so seriously wrong that it is painful to me.

    It is not much use to test if the clip is sufficient. Most likely
    the test depended more on seeing a calm bird can fly or not. If
    calm, even a bird not clipped and is a flier as well just will not fly away.

    So that clipped parrot may glide or flap the wings and flap and glide a longer distance. Those pseudo 'tests' give people false sense of confidence and thereby dropping their guard totally.

    And those owners in their ignorant bliss pet themselves on their backs and nod that their birds have wonderful clips and is safe and cannot fly away.

    BUT, in times of stress and when the bird is spooked, they will fly
    away. Those people have never seen the power of a bird that is spooked. They never can test their clipped parrots when they are spooked, by a car horn going off suddenly, by a sudden gust of wind, by a dog barking, by that lady walking past with a strange hat, and they think all is 'safe'.

    I reckoned more clipped parrots have been lost then flighted parrots.

    Not all harnesses are equal.

    When I lived in Taipei, a huge chaotic and fascinating city, I bought a commercial harness not knowing anything better to take Tinkerbell out for walks in the neighbourhood. That harness was so stiff and hard that after a few times, Tinkerbell resisted my attempts to put it on and I gave up.

    At home in the apartment, she flew about happily flying to me on cue as well as flying to me because she thought it to be a good idea.

    Eventually, I found a huge area, an office space under renovation, where I could take her to fly in what is termed as semi freeflight in enclosed conditions. That was in 2002 and with much discussions with Chris, Janet and others from FF list. (Free Flight list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Freeflight/)

    I documented that and I believe that was the first ever documentation in the FF list on semi freeflights as well as the disection of the mistakes made and solutions. Those reports can be read from Tinkerbell webpage http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9 in the section "Tinkerbell and her semi-free flights in large building"

    Those semi free flights are essential, AND MUST BE DONE, before you even think of taking your parrot out to free fly or fly on harness.

    I never intended at the beginning to fly Tinkerbell on harness. I stumbled onto this path by accident and kind of developed along.


    Eventually, we moved to Chiayi city at the foot of the Alishan mountain mastiff. But Chiayi is also surround by huge plains of padi fields. I thought it to be safe to freefly Tinkerbell in. The concensus then ( and it appears to be now still) was that parrot cannot fly more than 3 miles.

    I carefully selected a site many miles from the nearest groups of building. I deliberately allowed a clump of trees about 200 meters away thinking this may act as a lure to Tinkerbell should she not fly to me. I thought I could go those trees at worse to get her back again to me.

    I brought her there in carrier to show her around a few times. She hated harness so no harness for her.

    The first time she came out it was ok. It was ok still for a while. Then she spooked and flew. My mouth dropped as she flew and flew and flew, way way way beyond 3 miles. Thought you folks better be aware of that especially when you all seem to be mesmerised that 3 miles is still the limit,

    That was a nightmare that I do not wish on my worse enemy.

    I wrote of that experience so that if anyone want to try to free fly, they can get a taste of how that could be like.

    When I wrote those letters to the parrot mailing list on recovering Tinkerbell after two days and nights . I could not eat or sleep and did not know if I was alive or I was dead. If I had not recovered her, those letters would never be written.

    Since those letters were very long, I had to break that into 3 parts. My friends around the world had a shock of their lives as they all grew very attached to Tinkerbell. They thought that she was still lost at that time when I send of that first letter. They did not see that it was 1 of 3.

    You can read that experience and get a first hand taste of what it is like to be in the Overnighter's club below. You can also read my conclusion there and then.


    Tinkerbell free flight report 1 of 3
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/free2.html

    Tinkerbell free flight report 2 of 3
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/free3.html


    Tinkerbell free flight report 3 of 3
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/free4.html


    Tinkerbell free flight - In Retrospect
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/free5.html

    Ultimately, it was my deliberate targetting of kindergartens and junior schools with fliers and posters adding to my pool of eyes and ears with younger people more likely to see and talk among themselves that lead to final recovery. It was a kid that gave me the break I needed. Bear that in mind if you need to recover your parrot. Not that what I said help. I have seen so many recovery attempts here that did not seem to consider kids can be your most important assets as they are more honest and open.

    Our vision and our hearing is nothing like that of parrots with their much superior senses. What you deemed to be 'safe' may be very threatening to them.

    You cannot make assumptions on their behalf as to their surroundings. A few months after that incident, I came across an article in the local press that thousands of ducks in the farms around the area were dying. There was a military airbase in that area. To prevent accidents from birds striking the planes, the airbase used an ultrasonic device to scare away birds. That frightened the ducks leading to their death. It could just be that at that time when I took Tinkerbell for her truly free flight, that airbase might have activated the alarm scaring Tinkerbell and spooking her off.

    Since then, I knew I had to take a different course of action. I gave up all further thoughts of free flying. But I love the mountains and forests of Taiwan, more beautiful than my words can describe and far exceeding my ability to capture on photographs. So even if you enjoyed the photos I and my wife had taken, they are only a shadow compared to the true reality of those places. I wanted to take Tinkerbell with me even if she will not free fly.

    I decided to try using a harness that I designed. The commercial harnesses available for parrots then were, and still are, totally unsuitable. I strongly advice against buying them.

    On a trip to the mountains shortly after that, and with my martial arts background, I made an inspired step by making radically different assumptions in harness to create the new Tinkerbell harness. That hard and strong does not mean the harness is safer when they hate it and will chew that off. Soft seemingly weak harness may be stronger as they will accept it and not want to chew it away. I do not know if your parrot is like Tinkerbell. But Tinkerbell who could chew wooden toys to bits hardly chew on her harness after an short initial stage. It is your choice to make. But I have walked that walk with Tinkerbell still around even if with her present caregiver, who by the way, takes Tink out every evening and fly her in her harness.

    That harness was meant to take her out in and not originally thought of taking her to fly. That harness worked and Tinkerbell accepted it. So we went out with her in harness and a reelable dog leash. And of course, she flew a bit in it and seemed to be comfortable flying in that harness I designed. I did not expect her to fly in harness originally. Tinkerbell had different ideas and flew in that harness. I complied with her wishes and explore means to lighten her leash. That was how the harness was developed from just a harness to a flying harness.

    Then I thought what if I used a lighter leash. I found this high tech high strength braided fishing line made from Dyneema. I also found that this material is also used for bullet proof vest and stronger than Kevlar.

    Do see the report I made on the first flight of Tink with fishing line as leash in "Tinkerbell at Alishan Dinghu (first use of fishing line)" http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wtink01dinghu.htm

    We travelled high and low, far and wide after that. You can read and see the photos made of a small fraction of the trips we made. We were out almost every weekends. Tinkerbell was taken to fly from low down to me high up on a hill. She flew from up above to me several floors below. She flew in the mountains and forests. We went for walks to look at the stars and fireflies at night. She flew in winds near tyhoon force. She flew in gusty shifty winds. She was out from me at over 70 meters when a rainstorm suddenly hit. I gave the recall and she flew back in the rain.

    In the temple grounds to parks to seaside to meadows. She flew in a freedom that you can only get a glimpse of from my reports.

    She developed confidence and poise from outings to outings. I smiled when I read about how easily greys are spooked by even addition of a new chair in the house, or the color of a new shirt. I mentally contrast that to the thousands of new people she met in her travels and the new hotel rooms that she was introduced to almost every weekend.

    At first she flew to me on recall only in straight line. Then she varied it as her strength and confidence grew. Her best flights were never captured by my camera. She may fly to me, than soar in a twisting flight upwards to circle around, then fly in a big circle and weaved down to me. The memory of my camera ran out as we tried to capture those long flights. A shadow of that beauty exist only in my words of those reports as I tried by best to describe what could not be photographed.

    She rarely snag the line. Even when she did, I wrote in detail how to handle those snagged lines which seemed never to be read , or read and disbelieved in, or read and totally forgotten as snagging in trees pop up now and again as a snug reason as to why harness should not be used.

    Yes, the other reason against harness is that 'they hit a brick wall' when they reached the end of the line. I am sorry for plagiarising from what I have written before but I thought I gather that into this letter as well as it is going out to all groups.

    We need not worry so much about the flying to the end and the jerk.

    In all the 'end of line' encounters with Tinkerbell, she just kind of
    swivel onto a new direction. None of those 'hitting a brick wall'
    scenerio'.

    I wondered over that before and decided it was a matter of applied
    mechanics.

    First of all, our arm holding the line, the line, and her body all have
    a certain 'looseness' and give to them. The jerk is not an
    abrupt 'hitting of brick wall'.

    When they fly, their center of gravity , CG, is not and never will be
    at the point of tether to the harness. To be more explicit, that CG
    will be at the point of tether if that tether can be threaded
    physically through the heart. The stop will then be abrupt, but then,
    with the tether through the heart, you need not worry about her flying
    fast or even flying at all.

    That meant the CG is off-set away from the line. The point of
    attachment of the tether to the harness acts as a hinge. So when the
    end of line is reached, the body kind of rotate around onto a new
    direction.

    Tinkerbell knew it. There had been many times she deliberately flew to
    the end of the line away from me to twist at the end to fly in big
    circles a few times before returning back to me again.

    Tinkerbell love the harness I made for her. To the extent that when I did not take her out on the regular time, she would pick that up and flew over to me chastising me that I did not put it on to take her out in.


    Now, as to that final step for people on the free flight list where you take your parrot to that first free flight in the open, do not just consider that just as one step of from step 3 . "semi freeflight in enclosed conditions" to step 4. "Freeflight in the open" just as step 3 "semi freeflight in enclosed conditions" is a step from step 2. "free flight at home"

    Those steps are merely numbers. The chasm between step 3 and step 4 is ten times that from step 2 and step 3. Should you ever try step 3 "semi freeflight in enclosed conditions" for the first time, you will encounter pounding in your heart like never before even though you know the bird is flown in safe enclosed conditions.

    People have free flown safely. My bird whisperer of Tsaoling, Chris Biro, Bart, Janet, Gay and a few more came to my mind. The conditions and most important, their temperament and the temperament of their flock are unique to them.

    Harness can be a safe intermediate step between step 3 and step 4. Your parrot can be brought out to be familiar with the surroundings and to get use to the outside. With that harness on, you do not have fear in your marrow and your heart pounding away. Parrots are empaths, and your very fear of them flying away may cause them to fly away. If you take your parrot in a carrier, it will not be the same. Imagine you are a parrot and in a carrier as against you as a parrot wearing a harness. The view and perception you will have will be very different. You as the parrot will be more comfortable in that place.

    Then if your parrot wearing the harness is given recall cues and flies back on short distance, that will further lessen the fear of your parrot and of yourself. Nothing is ever certain. But you have decrease the chances of spooking very much more by also training and getting your parrot used to the harness.

    The choice of that final step is yours. You have her safety , and also her happiness in your hands and only you can decide if you are going to cross that Rubicon. You will only make that choice when you are ready to. You may not even need to go into step 4. Taking her out to let her fly in harness may be enough for you. Even if she is clipped, taking her out in harness and leash will give you a lot more security that not in harness amd leash at all.

    Now, should you have removed the harness to let her fly freely, what about that lovely park in the next valley, or the lake side that you love?

    Does it make more sense to take her there in her harness that she can fly a bit as well as the carrier cage to put her back into should it rain?

    Or is free flight as flights in a closed warehouse or around your house only what you are contented with?

    If your answer is no, either you are as good as Chris that you need not consider harness or you are as bad as me and think harness and leash can be your answer.


    More important than the harness would be the training and bonding I and Tinkerbell had. I wrote that in detail, kind of road map for anyone who may
    want to do what I have done.

    I wrote of how to make safe the home environment and what you expect
    from a flighted parrot at home in Tinkerbell Legacy. The URL pointer
    to that is also in her home page.

    I cannot recommend any of the harnesses that are now being sold
    commercially. Even if you do not intend your bird to fly with them,
    they have very serious design flaws.

    I just list some of them.

    1. They are stiff and uncomfortable for your bird. Even if they
    tolerate the harness at the beginning, in time, they will not allow
    you to put them on. I bought Kaylor harness. Tink was ok the first
    time. Each time met greater and greater resistance and after 6
    times, I gave up trying. Until Tink flew away on the free flight, I
    had to rethink seriously harness again.

    2. Some of the harness uses elastic which can stretch. In flight,
    especially spooked flights, that may lead to their release.

    3. The commercial harnesses relied on small teensy buckles that are
    difficult to put on. It is not likely that your bird will tolerate
    for long the fiddling that you need to do to put them on

    4 . Correct fitting is of paramount importance. As CAGS ranged from 300 grams to 500+ grams, it is not possible one size fits all even just in that one species. You must size your own harness to your own bird. Or do you wish to rely on "one size fits all"?

    4. All of them uses the spring loaded thingy wingy to latch the
    leash to the harness. That may be satisfactory for dogs and cats or
    even ferrets. Now, after Tink got the hang of it, she undid those
    spring loaded thingy wingy in half second flat. I was walking on a
    mountain road shrouded in mist when I heard that 'click' and realised
    the leash was hanging down from my hand. You can read that full
    account in
    ' More development of Tink harness during trip to Alishan mountain'
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/harness4.html

    You do not want that happening to you. Can you allow the safety of
    your beloved fids on those devices? Can you hope that they are so
    much more stupid than Tink that they cannot figure out how to open
    those thingy wingy?

    I cannot but stress how shocked I am that those kind of fastenings
    are used for for all harnesses for parrots

    You need not do the design. I did the design, tested at each stage
    by Tinkerbell and finally refined to the stage I can do that easily
    even though I dunno how to sew.

    All you need is either a nice thick shoelace or the soft lanyard that
    you hang your mobile phone on and the high tech Dyneema braided
    fishing line that I recommend using. That same fibre is used for
    bullet proof vest and stronger than Kevlar. Do not use monofilament
    as braided lines are much more flexible and resistant to abrasion.

    If you are worried that your parrot or macaw or alex chew through those shoelace or lanyard, thread a couple of Dyneema fishing line through the center or the shoelace/lanyard for security.

    I wrote on my design in detail together with URL pointers to step by
    step photos. The most important part is the principle of it.

    You may take 3 times as long as me to make that harness. But I need
    10 minutes, of which much time was actually spend in photographing
    the step by step. So you figure how long you need to spend.

    If your bird is clipped and you like to take her out, you need not go
    through all that I recommend for a flighted bird. No need for
    recalls or prior flights in secure big space. But clicker training
    is always a very good idea to train and bond with your fid even if
    you have no intention of flying her.

    But you must accustom your bird to the harness.

    I am cutting and pasting a portion of Tinkerbell Legacy. See that
    part that dealt with the harness and how to put it on.


    Tinkerbell Legacy - Final Rant - Bringing it all together
    http://www.livejournal.com/users/shanlung/5196.html

    (if you like to read that in full, go to above URL. If you have not
    done so, read the earlier rants I made on Tinkerbell Legacy dealing
    from home environment to clicker training )

    =========================================================

    I also thought I should bring to a conclusion the legacy of Tinkerbell.

    I had written earlier of clicker training and of the target stick. For more details of clicker training, it is strongly advised you join either of the two clicker training groups that I mentioned before.

    The training that you will be doing together with your charge is a long term process. It is also a daily process. It is not so much as to training but a bonding that you do with your charge. In my view, they understand you much better than you may understand them. The training should not be a mechanical process that with enough repeats, you can get them to do things immediately like clockwork. Perhaps that can be done. But ask yourself, will that be enjoyable to her? and to you? that you can proceed to do such unenjoyable procedures on a daily basis? It is far better to have a routine that both likes and look forward to. If you got a flying bird, if she does not like it, it will not be possible to make her do it. It is much more important to keep it interesting enough for her to like what you are doing with her. Many repeats one after another is not going to fit that most important requirement.

    Life must be more than mindless rote training on either side.

    Clicker training session with Tinkerbell consisted of maybe 25% clicker training intersperse with lots of talking and headrubs. That may be sessions of 5 to 10 minutes long and about twice or three times a day. The daily outdoor flights with her were part of the training but not considered as clicker training here.

    With that 'touch target' technique, you are onto a lot of other tricks that you can teach her.

    I bought those different color and shape baby toys with the thought of teaching her color and shapes. I laid them out in front of her, use the target stick to touch one of them and told her to touch target. She immediately knew it was not the stick and the block being referred to. I had visions of getting her to pick up objects by verbally telling her the color and shape and she getting that right and dropping into the container. It went so well that first session that I thought it was going to be too easy.

    She picked up the blocks as indicated by the target stick. She got clicked and treat a few times. I placed out my hand and told her to drop it there. She walked up to my hand and placed it. She got clicked and treat. What happened was a quirk of fate. HalfTail my cat and Zorro my ferret were also let out to play on the floor and they happened to be there at that time. The block slipped from my hand and fell near HT. HT had a fright and jumped up.

    Tinkerbell thought it was so much fun to frighten poor HT even if that first time was an accident. At the next request to pick up the block with the target stick, she did that and deliberately threw it down near HT. HT had another fright and ran away. Tink then took another block and flew to aim at HT. I got excited myself and added my emotions to the situation and Tink felt it was a great game she got on to, taking blocks and hurling at HT and Zorro.

    That ended the attempts to teach Tink to pick up blocks. That was another reason why I felt parrots, or at least Tink is an empath able to pick up emotions. I did not feel it fair (and I was too lazy) to want to lock up HT and Zorro everytime I teach Tink. Everytime I took out the blocks, she would pick one to throw at HT or to fly with it to bomb HT. That was Tink's interpretation which I could not correct or bring myself to correct.

    I store those blocks away. But perhaps you may have better luck with that especially if you do not have other pets around to act as distraction.

    My main aim at that time was to get Tink to fly back to me on cue. I focused on 'touch target'. But with variations of touching the target stick. To get her to bend up and bend down and walk or fly to the target stick was too easy. I had to use more complex variations to keep her interest. You can see that in an old letter together with photos of her doing that.
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/clicker-L-tinktouchtarget.html


    This 'touch target' was the basis of how I taught her to fly back to me on recall.
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/w8recalltraining.htm

    The above URL is an earlier letter that I wrote on recall training. Even if your parrot does not fly as yet, you should teach them recall training even if they walk to you now. You get them into the habit of coming to you when you call them. When they can fly, it will be that much easier.

    If your parrot do not fly now, it may be possible to get them to fly later when new flight feathers are grown. This may not be a definate thing. If your parrot had not been allowed to fledge and fly for a few weeks before the feathers were clipped and if they are many years old now, they may not even fly after the flight feathers are grown again.

    You cannot teach them how to fly. After all, you cannot fly yourself. BUT, you can give them a very safe environment for them to practise their first flights. The first flights can be very scary for them and for yourself. It was scary for me and very painful to watch her hit the walls and slide down. If I had to do that again, I would have prepared a special room with nettings along the walls for her to cling to.

    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wflyindoor1.html

    Above URL is another earlier letter on teaching your parrot to fly indoors.

    After your parrot is flying about inside your house and coming to you on recalls, you need to take her to fly in much bigger enclosed areas. If you live in a huge mansion, you should also take her to that bigger enclosed areas. You need to let her really stretch her wings safely and you need to gain the temperament and confidence in yourself and her. Your fear can affect her and this is a vital step before attempting harness on outside.

    Go into Tinkerbell webpages and read all that I wrote under the main category of "Tinkerbell and her semi-free flights in large building" . You may find the mistakes I made so you need not repeat them. Most of all, you and her will have the fun of it.

    With successful recalls in big enclosed areas, you can now think of taking her out in harness.

    Do read what I think of harness usage in "Using Harness"
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wUsingHarness.html

    Your parrot must be ready to wear the harness. To wear the harness, she must allow you to stroke and touch her all over. If your parrot likes head rubs, you use that as a starting point. While giving her head rubs. extend your other fingers to stroke her back. At any point when she does not like, stop and do not go on and get back to just head rubs. Slowly, you get to stroke her wings, and under her wings, her back, and her stomach. Take it easy and as a game with her. You got many many more months and years ahead of you. Do not stress her or yourself.

    Read all the letters I wrote on harness design. Each of those letters have been chronologically written with increment on the design but building up on earlier knowledge.

    The very first letter setting out the principles of Tinkerbell harness is the most important of the harness letter
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/harness1.html

    Even letters without harness in it contain matters relating to harness and touches on or was the foundation to later changes in harness.

    The final letter on harness "Tinkerbell - Harness for Dennis" gave the photo by photo stages of the last version of Tinkerbell harness.
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/wtinkharnessdennis.htm

    When I was out with Tinkerbell, I used two harnesses with her all the time. The first was the visible harness and line used more to reassure me that she could not spook and fly away. The second and most important harness and line is the verbal connections I maintained with her. I talked to her to reassure her and that was what kept her with me.

    In outside recalls, and indoor recalls, or anything I need of her for that matter, I always talked with her until I felt she was ready to do that and then and only then, I gave the cue. If her eyes were not on me and mentally she not with me, I try not to cheapen the cue by using it. The cue should only be used when you know it would be effective.

    There had been distinct times when I knew we were in mental connections (Please do not quote that con-man former magician and former escapologist Randi as if he is the final arbiter (read some of the articles I found on Randi in the links in http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/randi.html and demand I write a 'scientific paper' the way I was demanded to do after I wrote of Ivan my cat in "Tinkerbell Legacy - Start" http://www.livejournal.com/users/shanlung/1564.html
    and specifically in
    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/ivan1.html

    In the late evenings with Tinkerbell been recalled from over 30 meters away, I could not see her from that distance. I talked to her for a while and somehow I knew she was with me and I gave recall cue. And at that point in time, I knew she would take flight to me. If you have played at darts, there are some shots that felt sweet and that you know will hit exactly the point that you wanted the moment that dart left your finger. There is no mistaking that feeling. When you miss the mark, you never ever get that sweet feeling.

    I need not raise my voice in that distance, but I knew that she knew. Its just a strange mental feeling that happened in about one in every 3-4 recalls when I could not see her. Perhaps I noticed visual aspects in that distant grey on grey. Perhaps I just did know. And your choice to interprete as you like.

    That same person demanding that I submit a 'scientific paper' mentioned that she got bitten by her parrot as she tried to take note of the pinning of the eye before the bite. Now, the eyes may pin before the bite. The eyes may also pin very quickly before the bite. BUT, before the pinning of eyes, there are so many shades of feeling that the parrot will exhibit, that she is nervous, that she is unhappy, that she is very very unhappy, then they pin the eyes and bite. It is just sad that those entire range of emotional display from a parrot can be blissfully ignored and not taken noticed of.

    That is why I kind of insisted that you treat the parrot as friends and not something to be 'trained' and that you are the 'alpha' and commander.

    Before that, that had been occasional times I forgot to hook the line to the harness. I am sure she knew, but she never flew off from me and I had the feeling she was amused when I realised to my fright she was not hooked. It even got to a stage that harness and hooking of line was incorporated into a verbal check with my wife before we walked out of the apartment.

    And this is not something I encourage. In the last month before I left Taiwan, when I reached my apartment and before I go inside. I removed Tinkerbell's harness when we were in the open. That was done rather deliberately by me. She knew she was free. But she flew back to me from her motorbike perch and we walked into the apartment.


    Warmest regards

    Shanlung


    http://www.geocities.com/shanlung9/
     
Thema: Tinkerbell
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